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WORK-AT-HOME SCAM FAKE ARTICLE WARNING
THERE'S A STORY CIRCULATING ON THE INTERNET THAT LOOKS LIKE AN MSNBC.COM STORY WRITTEN BY ME. THIS STORY IS TOTALLY A SCAM AND MSNBC IS PURSUING THE PERPETRATORS. HERE'S A LINK TO A POST I WROTE ABOUT THE FAKE STORY. PLEASE DO NOT DO ANY BUSINESS WITH THE COMPANY MENTIONED IN THE FAKE ARTICLE.
eve-speaks.jpgEve Tahmincioglu is an award-winning labor columnist and director of communications for Families and Work Institute, a workplace think tank in Manhattan. She is author of "From the Sandbox to the Corner Office." Forbes named this blog one of the top career sites for women; CareerBuilder named it one of the 9 Job Blogs You Should Be Reading; and CareerBuilder and CNN named her one of the top job tweeters on Twitter.
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Martin Luther King’s Battle for Working Poor Cut Short18 Jan 2016 10:01 am

king.jpgWe all think of Martin Luther King, Jr. as an advocate for racial justice. But he was also an advocate for economic justice.

He was about to embark on his second mission, beyond desegregation, that included a battle for worker rights in the shape of better wages and better working conditions for the working poor. The next movement – the Poor People’s Campaign.

“This is a highly significant event,’’ King said in 1968, ‘‘the beginning of a new co-operation, understanding, and a determination by poor people of all colors and backgrounds to assert and win their right to a decent life and respect for their culture and dignity’’

Right before King was assassinated, he took up the battle of sanitation workers in Tennessee who were fighting for better working conditions.

This from The National Archives:

During a heavy rainstorm in Memphis on February 1, 1968, two black sanitation workers had been crushed to death when the compactor mechanism of the trash truck was accidentally triggered. On the same day in a separate incident also related to the inclement weather, 22 black sewer workers had been sent home without pay while their white supervisors were retained for the day with pay. About two weeks later, on February 12, more than 1,100 of a possible 1,300 black sanitation workers began a strike for job safety, better wages and benefits, and union recognition.

Who knows what he would have done for workers’ rights at that volatile time in our nation’s history. (more…)


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